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#21 Indigo

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Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:02 PM

And, most importantly, wacked!

majorly wacked. Mechusrei emunah. For buying more than one ticket as if God needs odds.

#22 Snag

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Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:32 PM

Besides the fact that the whole thing is ridiculous. Nobody could possibly for buying tickets for a school into any definition of hishtadlus. Its rank stupidity.
" All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind."

#23 warren

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Posted 14 January 2016 - 06:09 AM

matzav.com: The Powerball Pledge: Charity Campaign Draws Hundreds of $1M+ Donations
 
campaign encouraging donors to pledge a portion of their potential Powerball winnings has made Oorah millions in pledges. With the Powerball lottery reaching unprecedented heights, Oorah tapped into the hype the jackpot has created to garner pledges before the drawing. Their pitch was simple: we know it’ll be hard to reach you after you win, but we also know you really want to spend your newfound wealth on a great cause. Hundreds of millions in pledges have been pouring  in as participants experience what it’s like to be a philanthropist.
 
“We definitely plan on collecting the amount pledged from the winner, so we encourage donors to make sure their pledges are sincere,” an Oorah representative tells.

The campaign’s webpage, www.oorahauction.org/powerballpledge, allows donors to view other pledges in addition to making their own pledge.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism.

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#24 Moshi

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Posted 14 January 2016 - 10:19 AM

I'm not sure what 'pretending' means in this context. Sender still believes that if does not use his doctor, he will not get better. Brian believes the same thing. In this cause and effect sense, both believe that doctors are 'efficacious'.

The difference between them is that Sender also believes that the reason, or causative agent, of his getting better via going to a doctor, is G-d. Brian, being an apikores of sorts, believes the causative agent is solely the doctor.

 

When we say that God causes Sender to get better we don't mean that God reaches down and cures Sender with a magic fairy wand. It's more like God created human beings in a way that they can choose to use their abilities to learn to cure illness. So yes, it comes from God. But not via a magic fairy wand.



#25 warren

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Posted 14 January 2016 - 03:04 PM

matzav.com: The Powerball Pledge: Charity Campaign Draws Hundreds of $1M+ Donations

 
follow-up from YWN Breaking Record: Jewish Charity Raises 1 Trillion in 24 Hours

This reminds me of the joke of the breakin at the UJA, the burglars made off with a million dollars in pledges.
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#26 Indigo

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Posted 15 January 2016 - 06:27 AM

http://www.tabletmag...ampaign=jan2016

#27 Rainbow

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 04:44 PM

I was thinking about this topic. Wouldn't you say that applying to a school that has an extraordinarily low acceptance rate is nothing more than gambling? Since you pay money for the application and the truth is that if you have the prerequisites, getting accepted is mostly luck since you're competing with people who are just as qualified as you?



#28 Snag

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 04:48 PM

I was thinking about this topic. Wouldn't you say that applying to a school that has an extraordinarily low acceptance rate is nothing more than gambling? Since you pay money for the application and the truth is that if you have the prerequisites, getting accepted is mostly luck since you're competing with people who are just as qualified as you?

At what odds are we classifying something as gambling? 1:10? 1:100?
" All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind."

#29 Rainbow

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 05:25 PM

At what odds are we classifying something as gambling? 1:10? 1:100?

Right. Like when you go to a Chinese auction and there's that one prize that nobody wants. If you have a high chance of winning, is it less gambling than the prize that everybody wants?



#30 David

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 07:28 AM

I was thinking about this topic. Wouldn't you say that applying to a school that has an extraordinarily low acceptance rate is nothing more than gambling? Since you pay money for the application and the truth is that if you have the prerequisites, getting accepted is mostly luck since you're competing with people who are just as qualified as you?

 

What if you're having trouble finding work. You have reason to believe that your chances of getting hired are extremely low due to lack of recent work experience, age, religious practice, et. al.  Should you give up? Is it gambling to keep applying for jobs?



#31 Rainbow

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 12:40 PM

What if you're having trouble finding work. You have reason to believe that your chances of getting hired are extremely low due to lack of recent work experience, age, religious practice, et. al.  Should you give up? Is it gambling to keep applying for jobs?

No, because no money is changing hands. If they ask you to pay a fee to apply for a job, it's a scam.



#32 David

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 03:18 PM

There are often costs associated with applying for a job: travel expenses, drug tests, consultant fees. I think you could just as well say that a school application fee is a scam, except that it's such a widespread practice that it's become accepted.






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